You can build stilts to varying degrees of strength, depending on what materials you use. Keep in mind the size of the child (or adult) who is going to be using them and the weight of the materials you plan to use, as you don't want to make the stilts too heavy. On the other hand, they will obviously need to be strong enough to be able to withstand the weight of the person using them.

pair-of-stilts

Materials and Tools

A couple of lengths of timber- ensure that they have no knots in them as knots are weak points and the timber will break

A couple of offcuts of timber for the footholds

4x coachscrews or bolts sufficient length to fix the footholds onto the uprights

Saw

Sandpaper

Drill

Rubber pieces to go on the bottom of uprights to aid grip. (Optional)

Step 1

Cut the footholds out of the offcuts of timber, and drill 2 holes for the coachscrews or bolts.

footholds

Step 2

Ensure the 2 uprights are of equal length, and are sufficiently long enough for the combined height of the person who will be using the stilts and the height of the footholds. If the timber you are using has sharp edges if is a good idea to sand them down so they are smooth and pleasant to hold.

Step 3

Mark where you would like the footholds to go and attach. Firmly hold or clamp the footholds in place and drill either pilot holes if you are using coachscrews or drill all the way through if you are using bolts. Attach firmly. If you would like to be able to change the height of the footholds, now is a good time to mark and drill extra holes at different intervals on the uprights.

Step 4

As an optional safety extra, consider attaching some rubber to the bottom of the uprights to add extra grip. Cutting up an old bicycle tyre is ideal- wrap and glue each piece under the bottom of the uprights and screw into the sides.

how-to-build-stilts

As an alternative to using timber, and if your child is small, you could look at using other materials that you might find lying around- for instance a couple of poles, shelf brackets and hose clamps. This would be a more lightweight version, as small children might find timber stilts too heavy and cumbersome. Use commonsense though, as they will have to withstand the use they will be receiving, and you wouldn't want them collapsing on your child and causing injury.

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